Assessment Types

There are a number of different assessment types you may encounter during your tests. Be sure you know the strategies so that you can be successful in any situation.

  • Fixed-choice questions are usually designed to test understanding of terms and definitions. This category includes multiple choice, true/false, fill-in, and short answer.
    • Multiple choice questions usually have one correct, or best, answer. Use the process of elimination to select the best choice by eliminating the wrong answers first, and working up to the correct one.
    • Read the question carefully.
    • If at all possible, read all the questions on the test before you begin.
    • Do not make assumptions—especially in true/false questions.

 

  • Essay and Short Answer Questions are designed for deeper understanding and comprehension of the topic that requires more than just surface learning. These questions are usually designed to test your ability to apply what you have learned under a specified condition.
    • Answer the questions you know best first. Writing responses to questions you know often helps you to respond to the questions you are not sure of.
    • Budget your time.
    • If you have time remaining at the end of the test, review your responses.

 

  • Interviews are controlled communication that exists between individuals. Through dialogue, the tester is able to determine complete understanding of the material as it can be applied to a variety of situations. It is most often used in an environment where a best candidate must be selected to perform a task.
    • Do your homework—study the topic thoroughly. This often means researching information not only from your notes but also widely accepted knowledge.
    • Be prepared with handouts that reinforce your experience.
    • Practice—you may want to prepare some sample questions and review how you would answer.
    • Pay attention to detail - having knowledge of the general picture is good, but this testing mechanism is looking for a person who has the ability to pick up on details.
    • Make sure you understand what the interviewer is asking you. Answer the questions clearly and to the point. There is no time to be vague.

 

  • Simulations walk you through of a sequence of events similar to a work environment. This tests your ability to apply what you have learned to a given scenario.
    • Familiarize yourself with all the information available. It is usually a good idea to read through the documentation several times and take careful notes.
    • Design a plan—brainstorm for helpful ideas. You can always refine this list later if necessary.
    • Create a test plan—do this by creating a list of possible solutions and identifying outcomes or repercussions as a result of that solution. You will be able to find the best plan through the process of elimination.
    • Be aware of details that may impact your plan.
    • Be aware of outside influences.
    • Research is an important factor in simulations, in that you must be aware of what internal and external factors can impact your decisions for action.