A project of

The Face of Immigration Today: Diaspora (MLS 691)

Course Length: 8 weeks
Course Level: Graduate
Credit hours: 3 hours graduate credit

Interested students may apply credits toward a Master of Arts in Liberal Studies degree from Excelsior College.

Course Overview

The dispersion of a people is often precipitated by war, ethnic conflict, or economic difficulties and that dispersion results in the creation of a diaspora: a group of persons now separated from their roots. This course provides historical and contemporary data and case studies on the phenomenon of diaspora in the United States.

Perhaps not surprisingly, members of a diaspora often define themselves by their ethnicity or family affiliations. Many frequently maintain ties—financial, cultural, and emotional—to their homeland. In addition to providing historical and contemporary perspectives, this course addresses the impacts of globalization, the effects of conflict in one’s homeland, and the psychological and sociological consequences of migration and of events leading up to it.

The course also provides insight into issues confronted by individuals, family, and groups who have migrated to a new land, not the least complex of which is their development of a sense of identity and belonging. The important cultural contributions of diaspora will also be emphasized. Individuals living or working among immigrants will be encouraged to use course assignments to explore ways to enhance the experience for all parties.

New Populations and the Community: Diaspora (MLS 692)

Course Length: 8 weeks
Course Level: Graduate
Credit hours: 3 hours graduate credit

Course Overview

Diaspora is an important and unique force in world culture. This course exams diasporic populations and their impact on local communities.

  • Definition of "New Populations"
  • Demographic Patterns
  • Types of Changes and Challenges
  • Diaspora-Driven Economic Impact on the Schools and Community
  • Cultural Differences in the Schools and Community
  • Language and Modes of Communication in Schools and Community
  • Ideas about Gender, Age, Religion, Education
  • New Population Expectations and the American Dream